| 11.24.14

The Wisconsin Children's Trust Fund works to ensure that all Wisconsin children grow up in healthy and nurturing environments free from violence with an equal opportunity to reach their full potential.         

Adverse Childhood Experiences in Wisconsin

In recent years, we have learned a great deal about the importance of childhood experiences to lifelong well-being.  Early experiences have a broader and more profound impact than most of us would ever guess.  Everyday interactions and experiences in infancy and childhood greatly influence the architecture of our developing brains and our subsequent emotional, cognitive, social and neurobiological functioning.  In short, these early experiences affect the way we view ourselves and our world, the way we learn, how we cope with life's stressors, and how we form relationships throughout our lives.  Positive experiences in childhood often lead to healthy and productive adulthood.  Unfortunately, negative experiences can lead to poorer mental health, physical health, and socioeconomic status in adulthood. 

As part of the 2010 Wisconsin Behavioral Risk Factor Survey (BRFS), more than 4,000 randomly selected Wisconsin adults were asked about adverse experiences, or ACEs, they may have had prior to age 18.  The Wisconsin ACE report highlights the ACE -related findings from the 2010 BRFS, as well as policy recommendations for addressing ACEs in Wisconsin.

Please select to access the full report, "Adverse Childhood Experiences in Wisconsin: Findings from the 2010 Behavioral Risk Factor Survey." 

Wisconsin ACE Brief, 2011 and 2012 Data

Trauma Informed Organization Tools

The Children’s Trust Fund in partnership with the Wisconsin ACE & Trauma Workgroup have prepared two documents to serve as a guide for implementing service and systems-level change for child abuse and neglect prevention agencies that would like to become more trauma-informed.

Creating Trauma-Informed & Developmentally Appropriate Systems of Care in Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention: Guiding Principles of Practice

Trauma–Informed Organizational Self-Assessment for Child Abuse Prevention Agencies

Voices of Wisconsin ACE Survivors:
"There's nothing I can't overcome if I acknowledge the problem and ask for help I need." - Anthony

"ACEs have impacted my life deeply and still impact my life and my way of viewing and being in the world." - Melissa

 

Related links:

Center for Disease Control and Prevention

Child Trends Research Brief: ACEs National and State Level-Prevalence

Veto Violence (ACE infographic)